Kandinsky spiritual in art summary

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kandinsky spiritual in art summary

Concerning the Spiritual in Art by Wassily Kandinsky

A pioneering work in the movement to free art from its traditional bonds to material reality, this book is one of the most important documents in the history of modern art. Written by the famous nonobjective painter Wassily Kandinsky (1866–1944), it explains Kandinskys own theory of painting and crystallizes the ideas that were influencing many other modern artists of the period. Along with his own groundbreaking paintings, this book had a tremendous impact on the development of modern art.
Kandinskys ideas are presented in two parts. The first part, called About General Aesthetic, issues a call for a spiritual revolution in painting that will let artists express their own inner lives in abstract, non-material terms. Just as musicians do not depend upon the material world for their music, so artists should not have to depend upon the material world for their art. In the second part, About Painting, Kandinsky discusses the psychology of colors, the language of form and color, and the responsibilities of the artist. An Introduction by the translator, Michael T. H. Sadler, offers additional explanation of Kandinskys art and theories, while a new Preface by Richard Stratton discusses Kandinskys career as a whole and the impact of the book. Making the book even more valuable are nine woodcuts by Kandinsky himself that appear at the chapter headings.
This English translation of Uber das Geistige in der Kunst was a significant contribution to the understanding of nonobjectivism in art. It continues to be a stimulating and necessary reading experience for every artist, art student, and art patron concerned with the direction of 20th-century painting.
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Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Kandinsky: Concerning the Spiritual in Art

Art is the expression of the spiritual atmosphere of a certain period. Its form pertaining to its characteristic features evolves from the culture that inspires artistic expression. Copying form, where certain typical elements are imitated, such as that of ancient Greeks, leads only to replication deprived of significance. It is the inner insight that should guide the formation of ideals rather than just the reproduction of forms. Kandinsky engages the concept of a spiritual triangle that involves various constantly struggling efforts in his view of art and the world.

Kandinsky writes:. Such harmony or even contrast of emotion cannot be superficial or worthless; indeed the Stimmung of a picture can deepen and purify that of the spectator. In each picture is a whole lifetime imprisoned, a whole lifetime of fears, doubts, hopes, and joys. Whither is this lifetime tending? What is the message of the competent artist?

Concerning the Spiritual in Art Summary & Study Guide. Wassily Kandinsky. This Study Guide consists of approximately 12 pages of chapter summaries, quotes.
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Concerning the Spiritual in Art Summary & Study Guide Description

Dan Noga: Kandinsky, Spiritual Insight, and Abstract Art

It demands that you know how to draw well, that you have a heightened sensitivity for composition and for colors, and that you be a true poet. This last is essential. One of the pioneers of abstract modern art, Wassily Kandinsky exploited the evocative interrelation between color and form to create an aesthetic experience that engaged the sight, sound, and emotions of the public. He believed that total abstraction offered the possibility for profound, transcendental expression and that copying from nature only interfered with this process. Highly inspired to create art that communicated a universal sense of spirituality, he innovated a pictorial language that only loosely related to the outside world, but expressed volumes about the artist's inner experience. His visual vocabulary developed through three phases, shifting from his early, representational canvases and their divine symbolism to his rapturous and operatic compositions, to his late, geometric and biomorphic flat planes of color. Kandinsky's art and ideas inspired many generations of artists, from his students at the Bauhaus to the Abstract Expressionists after World War II.

This year marks the hundred-year anniversary of the publication of Wassily Kandinsky's classic book On the Spiritual in Art originally released in The following proposal outlines the relevance of this book to us today and proposes a commemoration of the centennial of its publication in the form of an online symposium to run in conjunction with a film screening. Introduction: Looking Backward In one sense, an anniversary is just an arbitrary marker; the fact that something significant happened exactly one year or one decade ago today has no actual bearing on today's events. The real significance of an anniversary, of course, is that it presents an opportunity for reflection and the structure of a framing device through which to view, assess, and examine our lives. It is in this spirit of reflection and examination that we propose to revisit Kandinsky's classic essay. The book's subject, which to many might seem an anachronism, affords us a curiously well-suited and timely vehicle for such an undertaking. The recent collapse of our economy has thrust us into a kind of cultural moratorium in which, finding ourselves uncomfortably suspended between crisis and transformation, we are being forced to turn inward, to look at ourselves.

Perhaps the greatest meditation on how art serves the soul came in , when Russian painter and art theorist Wassily Kandinsky published The Art of Spiritual Harmony , an exploration of the deepest and most authentic motives for making art. A pioneering work in the movement to free art from its traditional bonds to material reality is one of the most important documents in the history of modern art. Just as musicians do not depend upon the material world for their music, so artists should not have to depend upon the material world for their art. Several Circles — Wassily Kandinsky. He considers that in great art, the spectator, as a viewer, or a witness, does feel a corresponding thrill in himself. Such harmony or even contrast of emotion cannot be superficial or worthless; stimmung of a picture can purify the spectator.

1 COMMENTS

  1. Davet B. says:

    The artist is the hand that plays, touching one key or another, to cause vibrations in the soul.

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