Who said city on a hill

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who said city on a hill

Cities on a Hill by Frances FitzGerald

We must consider that we shall be A City Upon a Hill, the eyes of all people upon us, John Winthrop told his Pilgrim community crossing the Atlantic to found the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Four centuries later, Americans are still building Cities Upon a Hill.
In Cities on a Hill Pulitzer Prize-winner Frances FitzGerald explores this often eccentric, sometimes prophetic inclination in America. With characteristic wit and insight she examines four radically different communities -- a fundamentalist church, a guru-inspired commune, a Sunbelt retirement city, and a gay activist community -- all embodying this visionary drive to shake the past and build anew.
Frances FitzGerald here gives eloquent voice and definition to a quintessentially American impulse. It is a resonant work of literary imagination and journalistic precision.
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Published 31.12.2018

Nick & Becky Drake - City On A Hill - Lyric Video

"A City upon a Hill" is a phrase from the parable of Salt and Light in Jesus's Sermon on the "We must always consider", he said, "that we shall be as a city upon a hill—the eyes of all people are upon us". Today the eyes of all people are truly.
Frances FitzGerald

America is a shining city upon a hill

And, "As Ronald Reagan said in his farewell address to the nation, 'I've spoken of the Shining City all my political life. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That's how I saw it, and see it still. It is that ideal, the ideal of the American community, that we seek to restore,' he concluded. For George Herbert Walker Bush , it was on the campaign trail when the city on the hill shined so bright it became 'a thousand points of light.

God Almighty in his most holy and wise providence hath so disposed of the condition of mankind, as in all times some must be rich some poor, some high and eminent in power and dignity; others mean and in subjection. First to hold conformity with the rest of His world, being delighted to show forth the glory of his wisdom in the variety and difference of the creatures, and the glory of His power in ordering all these differences for the preservation and good of the whole, and the glory of His greatness, that as it is the glory of princes to have many officers, so this great king will have many stewards, counting himself more honored in dispensing his gifts to man by man, than if he did it by his own immediate hands. Secondly, that He might have the more occasion to manifest the work of his Spirit: first upon the wicked in moderating and restraining them, so that the rich and mighty should not eat up the poor, nor the poor and despised rise up against and shake off their yoke. Secondly, in the regenerate, in exercising His graces in them, as in the great ones, their love, mercy, gentleness, temperance etc. Thirdly, that every man might have need of others, and from hence they might be all knit more nearly together in the bonds of brotherly affection. From hence it appears plainly that no man is made more honorable than another or more wealthy etc. Therefore God still reserves the property of these gifts to Himself as Ezek.

We proclaimed a dream of an America that would be a Shining City on a Hill.
poetry is the criticism of life

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Ronald Reagan a shining city on a hill

The passengers of the Arbella who left England in with their new charter had a great vision. They were to be an example for the rest of the world in rightful living. Future governor John Winthrop stated their purpose quite clearly: "We shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us. The Arbella was one of eleven ships carrying over a thousand Puritans to Massachusetts that year. It was the largest original venture ever attempted in the English New World. The passengers were determined to be a beacon for the rest of Europe, "A Modell of Christian Charity," in the words of the governor.

American mythology teaches that the early United States was founded by men of conscience who came to the "new world" in order to practice their religious convictions in peace and freedom. John Winthrop — , the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, in particular has been quoted as a source of inspiration by U. Kennedy to Ronald Reagan. Yet Winthrop did not represent a tradition of either democracy or religious tolerance. He hated democracy with a passion. The state he created did not hesitate to execute people like the Quakers and even brought to the "new" world the very popular tradition of medieval Europe, the trial and execution of witches. The quotes from Winthrop below illustrate the troubling nature of Puritan society in Colonial America.

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