Books about native american boarding schools

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books about native american boarding schools

Native American Boarding Schools by Mary A. Stout

Hundreds of thousands of Native Americans are estimated to have attended Native American boarding schools during the course of over a century. Today, many of the off-reservation Native American boarding schools have closed, and those that remain are in danger of losing critical federal funding. Ironically, some Native Americans want to preserve them.



This book provides a much-needed historical survey of Native American boarding schools that examines all of these educational institutions across the United States and presents a balanced view of many personal boarding school experiences--both positive and negative. Author Mary A. Stout, an expert in American Indian subjects, places Native American boarding schools in context with other American historical and educational movements, discussing not only individual facilities but also the specific outcomes of this educational paradigm.
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Our Spirits Don't Speak English: Indian Boarding School

American Indian Residential Schools: Books for Young Adults

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The topic of boarding schools is very much alive in the discourse of social studies educators I have been listening to lately. Also, here is a Webquest on the subject, tailored for upper elementary and middle school students: Boarding School Webquest. Good for Nothing by Michel Noel is also very good for teen readers. Noel is a Metis author from Quebec and the book is available in English and French. It's set after a young man Nipishish leaves residential school, but he continually references back to his experiences and their effect on his life and community.

For this understanding to occur, children need to be able to make a connection between the history being taught and their own lives. The Indian residential schools were, by their very nature, places of violence, abuse, and neglect. Some struggled bitterly. Some suffered in silence. Some succumbed to tuberculosis or influenza and lost their lives. Others flourished and built a new sense of self within a wider world, while preserving Indianness in their hearts….

Hundreds of thousands of Native Americans are estimated to have attended Native American boarding schools during the course of over a century. Today, many of the off-reservation Native American boarding schools have closed, and those that remain are in danger of losing critical federal funding. Ironically, some Native Americans want to preserve them. This book provides a much-needed historical survey of Native American boarding schools that examines all of these educational institutions across the United States and presents a balanced view of many personal boarding school experiences--both positive and negative. Author Mary A. Stout, an expert in American Indian subjects, places Native American boarding schools in context with other American historical and educational movements, discussing not only individual facilities but also the specific outcomes of this educational paradigm. Mary A.

5 COMMENTS

  1. Erico T. says:

    Whats it all about philosophy and the meaning of life if i want to whistle i whistle 2010

  2. Mayra M. says:

    Indian boarding schools, now referred to as Native-American boarding schools, were created from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th.

  3. Gibert A. says:

    Selected Books

  4. Legget L. says:

    A broadly based historical survey, this book examines Native American boarding schools in the United States from Puritan times to the present day.

  5. Brooke B. says:

    Ask a Librarian.

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